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Category Archives: documentary photography

Access Robert Frank’s Photos

Robert Frank in action

Robert Frank in action

Did you know that the National Gallery of Art has a massive archive of Robert Frank’s photos and movies? Did you know you can access them? That’s right, you can view his work from 1937 to 2005. The archive even includes contact sheets, work prints, negatives, technical material, and even recordings. It’s the largest collection of Frank’s work anywhere in the world.

Click here to get further info on how to gain access to this archive.

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Happy New Year Photos From Around The World 2014

New Year 2014 Times SquareHappy New Year to my friends and followers. I thought you would like to see these exciting photos from the celebrations around the world. I hope 2014 will inspire you to new heights in your personal and professional lives.

 

“Family Of Man” – Historic Photograph Exhibit Returns

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Image

The Family of Man, a historic photographic show that was first exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in 1955, has returned to life at a castle in Luxembourg.

Edward Steichen curated The Family Of Man with 503 photographs from all over the world. After the Museum of Modern Art show, the exhibit went on to travel around the world. It has been seen by more than 10 million people and is considered the most successful photographic show of all time.

To read more about new The Family Of Man show and see some images, click here.

 

Photojournalists Using Instagram

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Benjamin Lowy's iPhone image of the destruction of Superstorm Sandy. © Benjamin Lowy/reportage by Getty Images

Benjamin Lowy’s iPhone image of the destruction of Superstorm Sandy. © Benjamin Lowy/reportage by Getty Images

There’s a trend forming. Photojournalists are now using Instagram and their smart phones to report everything from deadly storms to war to professional sports.

This brings up many questions. Photojournalism has long been about integrity, honesty and clarity. Will the one-click editing filters and ability to manipulate the images make them less believable? Is our world so hungry for quick information that we are willing to sacrifice quality? Is the job of a photojournalist becoming extinct?

There’s an intriguing article in American Photo Magazine about this situation. It’s worth the read. Benjamin Lowy, one of the photojournalists I curated into my exhibit “Wide Angle View” at the Orange County Center for Contemporary Art in 2011, uses an iPhone. He is giving a talk at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles on April 18, 2012. I am going and am very interested in what he has to say about the drastic changes in visual reporting.

Our world is speeding faster than ever. We need to keep up, but at what cost? I’d love to hear your thoughts on this.

Layover At Atlanta Airport

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Gods and Mortals

Gods and Mortals

Hello Friends and Bloggers,

During the past holiday season, I turned a bad situation into a good one. Long story short, my flight from Atlanta to Fayetteville, NC, was overbooked. I volunteered to take the next flight in exchange for a ticket voucher for a future trip. The problem was four hours of nothing to do but wander endlessly around the airport.

Santas and Soldiers

Santas and Soldiers

I gave myself a goal and decided to make a video. It ended up being a fun event, and I explored hidden corners of the airport that I never ordinarily would have. The four hours went by quickly once I had a purpose. The airline gave me a $12 dinner voucher, and my favorite traveling restaurant, Nature’s Table Bistro, happens to be in this airport. I got a great meal of balsamic chicken over brown rice and steamed vegetables for 8¢ – the price of the tax. All in all, I walked on to my next flight feeling like a winner. How can you argue with a free meal and free plane ticket? In addition, I got to shoot a video I never would have thought of doing. You can see the short video on You Tube.

In the Air

In the Air

Diane Arbus Quote #1

Diane Arbus at work

Diane Arbus at work

Taking pictures is like tiptoeing into the kitchen late at night and stealing Oreo cookies.
~ Diane Arbus, American photographer, March 14, 1923 – July 26, 1971
Diane Arbus was most known for her portraits of people who lived outside “normal” society. Her stark images of transgenders, circus performers and misshapen people branded her with a reputation of being a photographer of “freaks”.

Diane Arbus photograph

“Child with toy hand grenade in Central Park” 1962 by Diane Arbus

Diane Arbus portrait

Diane Arbus portrait “Young Man in Curlers”

Diane Arbus image of a circus performer

Diane Arbus image of a circus performer

Diane Arbus photograph

Diane Arbus photograph

In Memory Of Photographers We Lost In 2012

Time Lightbox Article

Time Lightbox Article

Time Lightbox has put together a beautiful memorial of the notable photographers that died in 2012. Examples of their outstanding work are included.   From photojournalists to fashion photographers, these professionals expanded the medium’s limits. Take a moment to view their contributions.

Jan Groover, Eve Arnold, Michael Rougier, Homai Vyarawalla, Yasuhiro Ishimoto, Sergio Lerrain, Lillian Bassman, Robert R. McElroy, Remi Ochlik, Stan Stearns, Paula Lerner, Lee Balterman, Jim McCrary, Horst Faas, Horacio Coppola, Prabuddah Dasgupta, Larry Keenan, Martine Franck, Malcolm Browne, Juan Antonio, Susan Carr, Pedro Guerrero, Bettye Lane, Michelle Vignes, Richard Gordon, Dody Weston Thompson, Alf Kumalo, Wilhelm Brasse, Walt Zeboski, Cornel Lucas, Arnaud Maggs, and Ken Regan – your work will be missed.

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