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Tag Archives: Photography

Access Robert Frank’s Photos

Robert Frank in action

Robert Frank in action

Did you know that the National Gallery of Art has a massive archive of Robert Frank’s photos and movies? Did you know you can access them? That’s right, you can view his work from 1937 to 2005. The archive even includes contact sheets, work prints, negatives, technical material, and even recordings. It’s the largest collection of Frank’s work anywhere in the world.

Click here to get further info on how to gain access to this archive.

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“Family Of Man” – Historic Photograph Exhibit Returns

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The Family of Man, a historic photographic show that was first exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in 1955, has returned to life at a castle in Luxembourg.

Edward Steichen curated The Family Of Man with 503 photographs from all over the world. After the Museum of Modern Art show, the exhibit went on to travel around the world. It has been seen by more than 10 million people and is considered the most successful photographic show of all time.

To read more about new The Family Of Man show and see some images, click here.

 

Photographs And Paintings Used To Launder Money

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The New York Times reports detailed information about how art work is used for laundering money. It’s not just drug cartels. Greedy CEO’s are able to hide their millions through the vague business practices of the art world.

This activity has always been whispered about in art circles, but seems to be more prominent now. The art market has never been subject to the accountability of financial transactions as in other businesses. Auction houses and top galleries claim anonymity is necessary with transactions in the millions. Why? I can imagine clients want to keep their purchases quiet for security reasons, but anyone who can afford a Matisse can afford to keep their collections safe.

Read the NY Times article for the dirty truth.

Yann Arthus-Bertrand Quote #1

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Yann Arthus-Bertrand photo

Yann Arthus-Bertrand photo #1

“The Earth is Art, The Photographer is only a Witness”.

Yann Arthus-Bertrand – From the book: Earth from Above, 3rd Edition

Yann Arthus-Bertrand photo #2

Yann Arthus-Bertrand photo #2
Yann Arthus-Bertrand photo #3

Yann Arthus-Bertrand photo #3

Yann Arthus-Bertrand at work

Yann Arthus-Bertrand at work

Philippe Halsman Quote #1

Phillippe Halsman - Salvador Dali

Philippe Halsman image of Salvador Dali in his studio.

“The immortal photographers will be straightforward photographers, those who do not rely on tricks or special techniques.”

Philippe Halsman, American portrait photographer. May 2, 1906 – June 25, 1979

Look closely at the unretouched image of Salvador Dali in his studio. Notice the thin lines from the ceiling to the items suspended from them. Imagine the time it took to set this tableau up. Today, Photoshop junkies blend many photographs together to create such scenes.

When I read Halsman’s quote, I am reminded of how far the pendulum has moved away from straightforward photos. In the age of Instagram’s one click manipulations, fantasy photos are easy to create. It seems the appetite for un-reality is bigger than it is for pepperoni pizza.

Philippe Halsman photo from 1953.

Philippe Halsman photo in Florida from 1953.

Personally, I got bored with Instagram after two weeks and closed my account. The “click and aahh” as I call it, was unsatisfying. Are my photos more interesting than before the filter, vignette, and frame are added? Only if I take a bad photo and want to make it passable. A good photo only becomes muddled, and loses its meaning.

Maybe someday the pendulum will balance itself again. Until then, what I find “aahh” worthy is becoming more rare.

Diane Arbus Quote #1

Diane Arbus at work

Diane Arbus at work

Taking pictures is like tiptoeing into the kitchen late at night and stealing Oreo cookies.
~ Diane Arbus, American photographer, March 14, 1923 – July 26, 1971
Diane Arbus was most known for her portraits of people who lived outside “normal” society. Her stark images of transgenders, circus performers and misshapen people branded her with a reputation of being a photographer of “freaks”.

Diane Arbus photograph

“Child with toy hand grenade in Central Park” 1962 by Diane Arbus

Diane Arbus portrait

Diane Arbus portrait “Young Man in Curlers”

Diane Arbus image of a circus performer

Diane Arbus image of a circus performer

Diane Arbus photograph

Diane Arbus photograph

A Holiday Visit To North Carolina Museum Of Art 2012

"Abdullahi Mohammed With Mainasara, Ogre-Remo, Nigeria" C Print 2007

Pieter Hugo’s “Abdullahi Mohammed With Mainasara, Ogre-Remo, Nigeria” C Print, 2007

On December 23, my husband and I decided to visit the North Carolina Museum of Art. We especially enjoy the modern art wing. I thought I’d share a few of the works that captured my attention on this visit.

The photo above is my favorite photographic piece on display. The power of the massive hyena (with a staggering bite of 11oo PSI) is controlled by the power of the man who handles it. Man vs. beast seem equally matched here. (Sorry for the glare. As you would imagine, the photo is under glass, and there was no way for me to get a clean shot.)

A visit to the North Carolina Museum of Art. Dec 23, 2012

Aaron Douglas, “Harriet Tubman” Oil on Canvas, 1931

The tribute to Harriet Tubman’s life is apparent in this painting. The subtle white ray and circular patterns on top of the painting gives it a feeling of hope. It is an illusion of the sun and light rays shining down on the scene, like a blessing from heaven. Douglas could have omitted this white wash of rays, and the painting could still be strong, but the rays add an extra emotional punch that I appreciate.

A visit to the North Carolina Museum of Art. Dec 23, 2012

Anselm Kiefer “Untitled” Mixed Media, 1980-1986

This Kiefer painting and mixed media work is massive. It takes up a whole corner of a room in the modern wing of the museum. Each time I see it, I notice more details. The complicated textures alone make me want to get lost in it.

A visit to the North Carolina Museum of Art. Dec 23, 2012

George Bireline “Matisse Window” Acrylic on Canvas, 1964

Matisse makes me happy. Bireline’s tribute to Matisse makes me happy. The masterful use of color and pattern lead me into this window and I want to open it to see the French Riviera just like Matisse did from his studio. I adjusted the white balance in my camera to show you the purity of the colors in this painting.

A visit to the North Carolina Museum of Art. Dec 23, 2012

Lyonel Feininger “The Green Bridge II” Oil on Canvas, 1916

Feininger has always been one of my favorite painters, but this cubist canvas has to be one of his best. Again, I adjusted my camera’s white balance so you can see accurate colors. Put your finger over the yellow doorway. Without that small touch, the painting loses interest. The man knew what he was doing.

A visit to the North Carolina Museum of Art. Dec 23, 2012

A hallway in the North Carolina Museum of Art with (L to R) Gerhard Richter, Robert Motherwell, and Joel Shapiro.

This is a shot of one of the hallways leading to wings of paintings and sculptures. Below is the same hallway, facing in the opposite direction.

A visit to the North Carolina Museum of Art. Dec 23, 2012

Another hallway of the North Carolina Museum of Art with (L to R) Lee Mullican, Andy Warhol, Adolph Gottlieb, and Joseph Albers.

We planned our visit so we could have brunch at the museum restaurant, Iris. We are never disappointed with the food and atmosphere of the well-lit, clean-lined room. If you haven’t experienced the restaurant yet, you will you enjoy the quality and taste of the menu, as well as the fair prices. I had a very creative version of eggs benedict (on cornbread muffins with fresh and locally grown ingredients) and it was only $12. Keep Iris in mind for your next trip to the museum.

Brent & Gina visit the North Carolina Museum of Art and enjoy brunch in Iris restaurant. Delicious!

Brent & Gina visit the North Carolina Museum of Art and enjoy brunch in Iris restaurant. Delicious!

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